Welcome to the site of Lost Lake Racing, home of Scott White and his sled dog racing team.

Due to the loss of both my parents around the 2012 holiday season, the 2012/13 season saw many fewer training miles than normal. As a result, it was a season where we tried our best to balance the needs for the future with the possibilities for the present. We downsized the kennel by finding homes for 14 dogs, while adding 9 puppies to the rebuilding effort. Given the much smaller than normal team, we focused the racing season on fun and local sprint races, placing 3rd at Conconully and 4th at the Cascade Quest. Then we started right away on training the puppies for next season in the hopes that we will have enough of the team rebuilt to ease our way back into distance racing, possibly by participating in the Stage Stop in Wyoming.

I love dogs, and I love the story of sled dogs. For thousands of years, these incredible animals have made it possible for we humans to survive in some of the most extreme and inhospitable environments by giving us the ability to travel and hunt for food. Because of the dogs' remarkable abilities, we've been able to explore the arctic and Antarctic, haul goods, and deliver mail. Sled dogs have even saved lives. The most well known act of sled dog heroism was their successful delivery of the serum to battle the diphtheria epidemic in Nome in 1925. How could I not want to be around dogs with such determination and strength?

The sled dog is the most efficient draft animal on earth, and up until the 1950's, they were the predominant mode of winter travel in Alaska. The advent of the snow machine and small aircraft eliminated the need for dog sled transportation. But by the 1970s, people wanted to reconnect with the old way of getting from place to place. Long-distance sled dog racing was launched with the Iditarod (1,000+ miles), and later the Yukon Quest (1,000+ miles). Down here in the lower-48 we have our own races like The Race to the Sky (300 miles) in Montana and the John Beargrease Sled Dog Marathon (400 miles) in Minnesota. All these races continue today and demonstrate just how phenomenally tough, resilient, and strong these dogs are.

While dog sledding gear may now be high-tech, and the dogs' kibble may be scientifically formulated, I strive to re-emphasize the origins of sled dog racing by traveling through and exploring some of the most wild, untouched, and inhospitable land on earth. My goal is to honor the environment and the amazing dogs that carry us through it. I hope your travels around our web site inspire you to come out to a race and see for yourself just how exhilarating this sport can be.